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Southern Pecan Pralines Recipe

Southern Pecan Pralines, a New Orleans signature candy, are sweet and crunchy and are great for sharing.  With this recipe, you can make a batch at home and enjoy a taste of the Big Easy.

pecan pralines
What Are Pecan Pralines?

Pecan pralines are a Southern confectionary delight made by caramelizing sugars together and adding pecans. Once the candy has cooked and cooled, it becomes a treat that is reminiscent of caramel fudge.

Pecan Pralines should not be confused with Praline Pecans.  The latter are pecans that have been individually coated in a sweet mixture and are enjoyed as candied nuts.  Pecan Pralines are candy with nuts.

How To Make Pecan Pralines

praline ingredients

For this classic Southern candy, you need the following ingredients:

  • 1 cup of sugar
  • 1⁄2 cup light brown sugar
  • 1⁄2 cup buttermilk
  • 1 tablespoon light corn syrup
  • 1⁄2 teaspoon baking soda
  • 1⁄4 teaspoon salt
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter at room temperature
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/2 teaspoon orange extract, optional
  • 2 cups chopped pecans

In a heavy bottom saucepan, add the sugars, buttermilk, corn syrup, baking soda, and salt. Cook slowly over medium heat until the mixture reaches 235F on a candy thermometer.

cooking sugar

Stir the mixture constantly with a wooden spoon while it cooks.  The mixture will begin to rise as the temperature increases.

caramelized sugars

Keep stirring making sure to stir the edges so that the sauce doesn’t burn.

Remove the pan from the heat once it reaches 235 degrees and add the butter, vanilla, orange extract if using, and pecans.

pecans and caramelized sugar

Stir continuously for ten minutes until the mixture becomes thick. As the sauce cools, it will turn into a thick, silky caramel.

making pralines

Drop by spoonfuls onto a parchment-lined baking sheet.

pralines cooling on parchment paper

Although it will be tempting to pick one up and eat right away, be sure to allow them to cool completely.  The pralines will be extremely hot and can burn you.  Give them at least 30 minutes before you check them.

It could take up to 2 hours for them to harden.  (If it is humid outside, it might seem like they will never firm up.  But don’t worry – you’ve got this!)

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4.24 from 13 votes

Southern Pecan Pralines

Southern Pecan Pralines, a New Orleans signature candy, are sweet and crunchy and are great for sharing.
Course Desserts
Cuisine American
Keyword candy, homemade, New Orleans, Pecans, pralines, southern
Prep Time 5 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Additional Time 30 minutes
Total Time 1 hour 5 minutes
Servings 1 batch
Calories 263kcal
Author Jane Smith

Ingredients

  • 1 cup sugar
  • ½ cup light brown sugar
  • ½ cup buttermilk
  • 1 tablespoon light corn syrup
  • ½ tsp baking soda
  • ¼ tsp salt
  • 4 tablespoons unsalted butter at room temperature
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • ½ tsp orange extract optional
  • 2 cups chopped pecans

Instructions

  • In a heavy bottom saucepan, add the sugars, buttermilk, corn syrup, baking soda, and salt. Cook slowly over medium heat until the mixture reaches 235F on a candy thermometer.
  • Stir the mixture constantly with a wooden spoon while it cooks. The mixture will begin to increase in volume as the temperature rises. Keep stirring making sure to stir the edges so the sauce doesn’t burn.
  • Remove from heat once it reaches 235F and add the butter, vanilla, orange extract, and pecans. Stir continuously for ten minutes until the mixture becomes thick.
  • As the sauce cools, it will turn into a thick, silky caramel. Drop by spoonfuls onto parchment-lined baking sheets.
  • Allow to cool completely (about 30 mins).

Video

Nutrition

Serving: 1/12 batch | Calories: 263kcal | Carbohydrates: 29g | Protein: 2g | Fat: 17g | Saturated Fat: 4g | Polyunsaturated Fat: 13g | Cholesterol: 11mg | Sodium: 120mg | Fiber: 2g | Sugar: 27g

Notes About Making Pecan Praline Candy

Not reaching the 235-degree mark will cause this recipe to fail. In order to effectively make the caramel sauce, the sugar mixture needs to reach an optimal temperature.

Once the pot is removed from the heat and you are stirring for ten minutes, the air that is incorporated into the caramel sauce will cool the mixture and make it thicker.

You will probably not notice a change for the first five minutes but the reaction is happening. Keep stirring gently and a thick and silky caramel will develop.

Patience, grasshopper.  Patience.

Praline candy can be stored for up to 3 weeks in an airtight container, if it lasts that long.  It can be frozen for up to 3 months in an airtight container.

As time goes by, the sugar in the pralines begins to re-crystallize and may start to appear grainy.  While you could possibly eat them in that state, it won’t be the same.

Southern Pecan Pralines

History of Praline Pecans

While pralines are a southern favorite, their history stems from the Old World back to the 1600s in France.  Originally, Chef Clement Lassagne created the candy using almonds and called it a praslin in honor of French diplomat César Duc de Choiseul, Comte du Plessis-Praslin.

As often happens with languages, the original term praslin morphed into today’s praline.

Pralines very may have made it to the United States via French Ursuline nuns.  The nuns taught young girls domesticated arts, such as cooking, of which candy making would be included.

In New Orleans, almond trees don’t grow well, unlike the native pecan.  It was the culinary genius of African-American women that led to the use of pecans in the confections which are considered one of the earliest street foods in America.


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Recipe Rating




Martina

Wednesday 13th of January 2021

I have made a copy of your recipe and will try making it sometime between now and February 14th. I will try on a day when my husband us not home so I can hide in the bathroom and eat ALL of them. But not all at once; it will take a few days at least. I have not had much luck with making candy that requires boiling to a certain temperature or stage. But I adore a GOOD praline. Mother had a buttermilk pecan praline that was fabulous but only my sister was able to get them to come out right. In your introduction you stated that you are a recovering sugar addict. I think I need those instructions even more than the praline recipe, if you dont mind sharing! Merci beaucoup! Tina